From its first human case in 1952 until just a few years ago, the Zika virus had affected relatively few people in Africa and Asia and was typically accompanied by mild symptoms: fever, body aches, rash, pink eye. Most people didn’t have any symptoms. But when it first appeared in the Americas in 2015 and was linked to congenital defects, including developmental issues and microcephaly (smaller-than-normal heads), affecting more than 3,700 newborns, particularly in Latin America, the world knew what Zika was.

 

Credit: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

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