Anti-vaccination groups have been around since the first vaccination programs were developed. Misleading and downright erroneous information has fueled resistance to vaccinations through the years. A British doctor in 1998 published a research paper investigating the alleged relationship between vaccinations and autism and bowel disease among those inoculated. The paper was discredited and shown to be fraudulent in 2011, but the damage was done. The non-existent connections are still cited even today as evidence vaccines are not safe. While like most everything, vaccination results aren’t perfect. But objective scientific data points overwhelmingly to the safety and efficacy of vaccines to prevent widespread outbreaks of controllable diseases such as measles, smallpox, tetanus, polio, typhoid, influenza, whooping cough and on and on.  Herd immunity requires vaccine interventions to evolve, and the overall health of our population depends on them. To eschew vaccines is irresponsible and puts entire population at risk needlessly.

Below are links to a few studies and research efforts that examine the efficacy of vaccinations and the risks of failing to inoculate.