A century ago, a severe bacterial infection was often a death sentence. With the advent of penicillin and the antibiotics that followed, such infections became eminently manageable, even routine. Today, though, with the rise of antimicrobial resistance, we are perilously close to returning to where we were 100 years ago.

I have a unique and uncomfortable perspective on the looming crisis of antimicrobial resistance. I am the chief technology officer SeLux Diagnostics, a startup focused on the rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases. And as I write this article, I am praying for my grandfather, who played a pivotal role raising me and is now fighting for his life against West Nile encephalitis. While intubated in one of the nation’s best intensive care units and beating the long odds against West Nile — never count out World War II veterans — he has been infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which exists in most U.S. hospitals, and is now being given broad-spectrum antibiotics.

Read more at STAT…