The authors of a new study on the timing of antibiotic administration in women undergoing cesarean section say the findings suggest current recommendations should be re-evaluated. The study, published today in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, looked at the rate of surgical-site infections (SSIs) in more than 55,000 pregnant women undergoing cesarean section deliveries who received antibiotics either before the incision, as is currently recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), or after umbilical cord clamping. The results showed no difference in SSIs between the two groups.

 

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