EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Background
There is a strong link between antibiotic consumption and the rate of antibiotic resistance. In Australia, the vast majority of antibiotics are prescribed by general practitioners (GPs), and the most common indication is for acute respiratory infections (ARIs).

Our primary objective was to assess the effectiveness of an integrated, multifaceted package of interventions to reduce antibiotic prescribing for suspected ARIs in general practice.

Secondary objectives were:
1. to assess the feasibility and uptake of the integrated package of interventions to
reduce antibiotic prescribing for suspected ARIs.
2. to assess and estimate the likely costs and cost-effectiveness of implementing the
integrated package of interventions to reduce antibiotic prescribing for suspected
ARIs.
3. to estimate the prevalence of bacterial pathogens in the upper respiratory tract
(throat and nose) of asymptomatic general practice staff and patients.
4. to assess the feasibility of conducting community antibiotic resistance surveillance by
using sentinel GP practices participating in the Australian Sentinel Practice Network
(ASPReN).

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