Age-related muscle loss, called sarcopenia, is a natural part of getting older. But after an injury, illness, or any prolonged period of inactivity, muscle loss can occur faster, leading to muscle atrophy. The consequences are greater weakness, poor balance, and even frailty. “People older than age 65 are especially vulnerable to muscle atrophy,” says Jodi Klein, a physical therapist with Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital. “It can take longer for the body to recover from dramatic muscle loss, but with the right strategy, older adults can protect themselves from muscle atrophy and rebound easier if it occurs, no matter what their age.”

 

 

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