Abstract The use of low-cost sensor technology to monitor air pollution has made remarkable strides in the last decade. The development of low-cost devices to monitor air quality in indoor environments can be used to understand the behaviour of indoor air pollutants and potentially impact on the reduction of related health impacts. These user-friendly devices are portable, require low-maintenance, and can enable near real-time, continuous monitoring. They can also contribute to citizen science projects and community-driven science. However, low-cost sensors have often been associated with design compromises that hamper data reliability. Moreover, with the rapidly increasing number of studies, projects, and grey literature based on low-cost sensors, information got scattered. Intending to identify and review scientifically validated literature on this topic, this study critically summarizes the recent research pertinent to the development of indoor air quality monitoring devices using low-cost sensors. The method employed for this review was a thorough search of three scientific databases, namely: ScienceDirect, IEEE, and Scopus. A total of 891 titles published since 2012 were found and scanned for relevance. Finally, 41 research articles consisting of 35 unique device development projects were reviewed with a particular emphasis on device development: calibration and performance of sensors, the processor used, data storage and communication, and the availability of real-time remote access of sensor data.

 

 

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