The Impact of Healthcare-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections on Postdischarge Health Care Costs and Utilization across Multiple Health Care Systems.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To measure how much of the postdischarge cost and utilization attributable to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) health care-associated infections (HAIs) occur within the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system and how much occurs outside.

DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING:

Health care encounters from 3 different settings and payment models: (1) within the VA; (2) outside the VA but paid for by the VA (purchased care); and (3) outside the VA and paid for by Medicare.

STUDY DESIGN:

Historical cohort study using data from admissions to VA hospitals between 2007 and 2012.

METHODS:

We assessed the impact of a positive MRSA test result on costs and utilization during the 365 days following discharge using inverse probability of treatment weights to balance covariates.

PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Among a cohort of 152,687 hospitalized Veterans, a positive MRSA test result was associated with an overall increase of 6.6 (95 percent CI: 5.7-7.5) inpatient days and $9,237 (95 percent CI: $8,211-$10,262) during the postdischarge period. VA inpatient admissions, Medicare reimbursements, and purchased care payments accounted for 60.6 percent, 22.5 percent, and 16.9 percent of these inpatient costs.

CONCLUSIONS:

While most of the excess postdischarge health care costs associated with MRSA HAIs occurred in the VA, non-VA costs make up an important subset of the overall burden.

Source

By |2018-10-11T21:16:36+00:00October 11th, 2018|

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