How Does BioProtect Protection Work?

The active ingredient in BioProtect polymerizes to all surfaces and is both colorless and odorless.

Think of BioProtect as a layer of electrically charged swords.  When a microorganism comes in contact with the treated surface, the quaternary amine sword punctures the cell membrane and the remnants are then electrocuted.

Since nothing is transferred to the now dead cell, the antimicrobial does not lose it’s strength and the sword is now ready for the next cell to contact it.  (NOTE: Normal cleaning of the treated surfaces is necessary in order for the BioProtect   antimicrobials to continue their effectiveness.  Dirt buildup,  paint, dead microbes, etc. will cover the treatment prohibiting it from killing microorganisms.)

Read More...

LINENS AND UNIFORMS NEED A DETAILED CLEANING PROTOCOL TO COMBAT SECONDARY INFECTIONS

LINENS AND UNIFORMS NEED A DETAILED CLEANING PROTOCOL TO COMBAT SECONDARY INFECTIONS

During our last consulting session at a hospital, we asked what measures were being taken in the laundry process to prevent the spread of healthcare-associated infections. The VP for facilities said the CDC didn’t see laundry items as vehicles that contribute to the spread of infection. They were concerned about the contamination of hard surfaces, and had procedures in place to deal with those surfaces. But soft and porous surfaces – linens, uniforms, bedding, curtains – were not being addressed in any detailed fashion. He said his hospital was following CDC guidelines. Laundry simply wasn’t on the list of potential concerns as it relates to the spread of infection. More than just a little evidence exists, however, that suggests that thought process might be flawed. Consider:

  • NOLA.com ran a piece that says five children died at Children’s Hospital in 2008 and 2009 after coming in contact with a deadly fungus transmitted to them through the linens they slept on, according to court records, interviews and a new report published by a pediatric medical journal. They included two newborns, a 13-year-old boy, a 10-year-old girl and an 11-year-old girl, according to the findings of a study led by a medical officer with the Centers for Disease Control and recently published by the Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal.

Why wouldn’t hospitals have all staff in antimicrobial uniforms? Plenty of companies make them.

Strict protocol with the handling of laundry can help immensely. Take a look at some of the procedures advocated by Healthcare Laundry Accreditation Council (HLAC), a non-profit organization formed for the purpose of inspecting and accrediting laundries processing healthcare textiles for hospitals, nursing homes, and other healthcare facilities (http://www.hlacnet.org/standards.php).  The detailed procedures HLAC outlines are complete and impressive. And doable.

Rate this blog entry:
SIGNIFICANT AMOUNTS OF DATA EXISTS TO DISMISS AIRB...
ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IS A GLOBAL THREAT

Related Posts

 

Comments

No comments made yet. Be the first to submit a comment
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Friday, 20 October 2017
If you'd like to register, please fill in the username, password and name fields.
Sign Up for Blog Updates
Stay Informed

 

Sign up to receive updated building health and safety news.

 
 
*required