How Does BioProtect Protection Work?

The active ingredient in BioProtect polymerizes to all surfaces and is both colorless and odorless.

Think of BioProtect as a layer of electrically charged swords.  When a microorganism comes in contact with the treated surface, the quaternary amine sword punctures the cell membrane and the remnants are then electrocuted.

Since nothing is transferred to the now dead cell, the antimicrobial does not lose it’s strength and the sword is now ready for the next cell to contact it.  (NOTE: Normal cleaning of the treated surfaces is necessary in order for the BioProtect   antimicrobials to continue their effectiveness.  Dirt buildup,  paint, dead microbes, etc. will cover the treatment prohibiting it from killing microorganisms.)

Read More...

DON’T BLAME PIGS FOR SWINE FLU—SPECIES HOPPING IS HOW VIRUSES EVOLVE

WHEN NEW SPECIES evolve, where do their viruses come from? As little more than free-ranging bundles of genetic material, viruses desperately need to hijack their hosts' cellular machinery and resources to replicate, over and over again. Without its host, a virus is nothing.Because of that dependence, some viruses have stuck with their hosts through...
Tags:
Rate this blog entry:

100 Years after the Lethal 1918 Flu Pandemic, We Are Still Vulnerable Our public health infrastructure has improved, but without a universal influenza vaccine, a similar virus could result in a worldwide catastrophe

In 2018 the world will mark the 100th anniversary of the most devastating infectious disease event in recorded history: the 1918 influenza pandemic.The severity of the event, which caused an estimated 50 million to 100 million deaths worldwide, likely resulted from several factors: First, most of the global population probably had no preexisting im...
Tags:
Rate this blog entry:

Pandemics, Politics and the Spanish Flu One of the worst plagues in human history is largely forgotten now. For our own sakes, it’s time to remember what happened.

Pandemics, Politics and the Spanish Flu
One of the worst plagues in human history is largely forgotten now. For our own sakes, it’s time to remember what happened.
The Spanish flu," Laura Spinney tells us, "infected one in three people on earth, or 500 million human beings. Between the first case recorded on 4 March 1918 and the last sometime in March 1920, it killed 50-100 million, or between 2.5 and 5 per cent of the global population — a range that reflects the uncertainty that still surrounds it. …It was ...
Tags:
Rate this blog entry:

Frequently Asked Flu Questions 2017-2018 Influenza Season

Frequently Asked Flu Questions 2017-2018 Influenza Season
​Note: For the 2017-2018 season, CDC recommends use of the flu shot (inactivated influenza vaccine or IIV) or the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine, also known as the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), should not be used again during 2017-2018. The 2017-2018 influenza vaccination recommendations are available.N...
Tags:
Rate this blog entry:

Winter flu warnings: Should I worry?

Winter flu warnings: Should I worry?
NHS bosses are warning we should be braced for a bad flu season. They cite the experience of Australia and New Zealand, which have just gone through their winters.What happens there, they say, tends to be a good pointer to how flu spreads in the UK.How bad has it been in Australia and New Zealand?They've certainly had their worst flu season for a n...
Tags:
Rate this blog entry:
Sign Up for Blog Updates
Stay Informed

 

Sign up to receive updated building health and safety news.

 
 
*required